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Index > Interior > Thread: That thick black rubber mat....
Thread: That thick black rubber mat....
nwaco


Redlining
Posts: 407
posted January 16, 2003 08:55 PM

That thick black rubber mat....

You know, that black rubber mat that is glued down under the carpet on the floor. It is also under the hood forward of the windsield. What is it and where can I get some new mat? On one of my trucks, it is cracked up and peeled off. Need to replace it before I finish the cab.

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wankel_dreams


Redlining
Posts: 293
posted January 17, 2003 08:43 PM

I don't where you can get some, but i know its a major pain to take it off. I'm not sure if it is glued down. I think the mat is bonded directly to the metal. Mine is about 1/4 removed with a chisels, rubber mallet, and wire wheel drill attachment.


____________
74 wankel panther
77 REPU
79 rx7
89 Vert

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brad


Rotorhead
Posts: 1671
posted January 18, 2003 06:15 PM

sound deadening tar

That is not a mat. It is sound deadening tar. If you remove it more road noise will come into the truck. And it also insulates heat/cold too. I'd keep it. My girlfriend's 94 geo metro does not have any and it is loud in there.

I have removed it in my 81 race car. Real pain since it is tar that has bonded with the metal. Hammer and chisel worked best. Some people use several pounds of dry ice to freeze it and it pops off. Then clean with wire wheel then turpentine.

You can buy car undercoating and stuff similar at local auto parts store.


____________
-brad-
74 REPU Lawn Green
81 Rx-7 racecar. 12a J-
Bridge

       
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nwaco


Redlining
Posts: 407
posted January 19, 2003 08:35 AM

I think I've got it........

I now have reasonably strong evidence to believe (less Isoscopic analysis) it is a material called "Bituthene" or "Bitumen", a tar-like material in sheet form bonded to the structure to deaden sound. It can be readily had by substituting a roofing barrier material for protection from Ice and Snow. It is essentially the same material. and it even comes with the adhesive backing already on it.

It is available in roofing supply stores. It probably won't help your 1/4 mile times, but is will cut down on vibration and noise.

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J-Ro


1st Gear
Village Idiot
Posts: 23
posted January 20, 2003 02:08 AM

After you remove all of the old stuff by one of the many methods discussed here or by the way I know most of you all are doing your frame ups, by Media Blasting the whole body, there are a couple things you might want to do.

You can go with Rhino Lining (http://www.rhinolinings.com) or DynaMat (http://www.dynamat.com) as a base before your carpet. Or in the case of just using Rhino Lining you don't really need carpet over it at all. I am opting for the DynaMat method in one of our trucks at the moment and I anticipate good sound reduction and insulation before the carpet kit goes in. We'll see, this may change depending on the mood, LoL.

Just a couple of suggestions even thought it's not right on with the initial thread.

FWIW, YMMV
____________
http://www.socalrxclub.com
http://www.sevenstock.org

       
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nwaco


Redlining
Posts: 407
posted January 20, 2003 09:45 AM

About the subject of rust protection....

For all of you who are using the "Rhino lining" or a similar method of "sealing" the interior of the truck be advised of a very serious side effect. Corrosion and rust. Not from the inside, but from the outside.

My day job is as a specialist in corrosion protection for commercial aircraft. I see more examples for metal corrosion and fatigue on a weekly basis than many see in a lifetime. We in the industry protect metal by keeping the main element in the process, moisture and salt, away from the metal. This is usually accomplished by use of a coating system, usually paint.

Now, for those of you who apply a coating of anything on the inside to look nice and protect, remember one thing, you are protecting your truck from moisture that comes from the inside. If you choose to do nothing to stop moisture from penetrating the nooks and crannies and seams from the outside, the moisture will invade the seams from the outside and start the rusting process under your nice new coating. The problem never shows itself until it starts "lifting and bubbling" the paint and by then it is too late.

My suggestion and the method I am choosing for my trucks, (one at a time, mind you) is to pressure clean, then media blast the entire assembly, then dry completely. I will then coat the entire assembly with a seam penetrating rust conversion coating. I will then apply a complete spray coating of an undercoating system followed by the interior application of the "bituthene" sound deadening sheets.

The key is to keep moisture out of the seams, and you can not do an effective job from the interior. The primary protective measure must be from the exterior. Period.

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Klaus43


Rotorhead
Posts: 1259
posted January 20, 2003 11:32 AM

Expert advice...

So, just what is THE best method for cleaning/prepping/converting/sealing the REPU's major body problem areas--such as the ends of the bed sides, where exterior panel overlap collects the worst? Whether blasting or dipping, the forseeable issue being getting media as well as crap completely back out of the seam so as to avoid repeating the problem... Compressed air? Wire brush/wheel? Brakleen? Also, which is preferable, blasting or dipping...and why? Thanks!

       
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brad


Rotorhead
Posts: 1671
posted January 20, 2003 02:29 PM

4.5" angle grinder and por-15

I recently addressed rust problems in the REPU's bed and cab. For the bed interior I used 1.5 gallons of paint stripper and stripped 80% of the paint out of the bed. Used Black and decker 4.5" angle grinder with a knot wire wheel to get the remaining 20% off, and get rid of stubborn rust. Then I used Por-15 Marine Clean to clean it, Por-15 Metal Ready to remove and stabilize rust, leave behind a phosphate coating that prevents rust. Then 2 coats of Por-15 Silver paint. Then 2 coats of Por-15 Top Coat primer. All in all took 38 hours and I have not even painted the bed yet.

Did the same with the cab interior, but mostly for the rear half of the cab plus the drain holes and kick panels in the front of the cab which had rust. Took about 8 hours including 2 coats of paint, and skipped the primer part: just sprayed paint right on the Por-15.

Be sure to wear a respirator, rubber gloves, and saftey goggles. Get a box of shop towels for wipe down. And lots of Patience.

http://www.por15.com

I'll post pictures once they're developed.
____________
-brad-
74 REPU Lawn Green
81 Rx-7 racecar. 12a J-
Bridge

       
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nwaco


Redlining
Posts: 407
posted January 20, 2003 05:49 PM
Edited By: nwaco on 20 Jan 2003 17:51

The "best" method is obviousely any action plan that one can afford to spend time and money on. I use media blasting because it is cheap and local. Dipping is great if you can afford it and it is readily available. I use compressed air to clean, followed by a solvent wash. I work wherever possible, from the exterior in, as I like to seal out moisture so I can verify the interior stays dry before I apply finish to the interior. I can complete a vehicle and drive it without much of the interior being completed. That way my method is proven and the interior is leak free before I seal it up and complete the interior package.

Brad, what about the exterior? That is where most of your moisture and road salts are coming from. What have you done to the bottom of your bed and cab? I know it is painful and if its a driveable vehicle, it is just plain not practicle, but you have to ackowledge you haven't yet solved your problem. You have only bought time and beauty. The rust devil is still lurking about is it not?

I have wote and posted my thoughts on rust prevention in a new thread for those that are in it for the long haul. And it is no easy task with no sure path to victory against this elusive enemy.

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brad


Rotorhead
Posts: 1671
posted January 20, 2003 06:47 PM

soon....

Under the truck rust isn't as bad as in the bed or in the cab (there was a water leak in there and water was pooling up; plust there was pile of rocks/pebbles under the vents that were trapping moisture in the cab!!). I'll eliminate the elusive rust enemy under the truck once it gets warmer out. I'll prolly do it in sections at a time so I won't have bare metal exposed to fog & high humidity for too long.

I've already redone the front undertray and front swaybar; and sprayed the undertray with nice matching Lawn Green enamel and 2 coats of clear. Sway bar got light blue paint and 2 coats of clear, matching it's original color. I think it's a Suspension Techniques 1 1/8" bar.

I wanted to get the bed interior done before the rain starts here in Los Angeles, and I did the cab interior while it was warm out.

For under the truck, I'll prolly use the angle grinder with knot wire wheel again and the Por-15 treatment. I might try the rust killer in your other post nwaco, I'm always looking for some thing better. Thanks! Some sort of undercoating is a good idea too.

Truck body is a different story. Not a lot of body rust, but enough to warrant stripping some areas down to the metal. I'll do this in the spring/summer when it's warm with low humidity in an attempt to keep moisture away from bare metal/just primered metal. I'll use Plasticote "Anti-Rust Primer" on the body. It's thicker and seals out moisture better than normal cheap primer.

Later,

____________
-brad-
74 REPU Lawn Green
81 Rx-7 racecar. 12a J-
Bridge

       
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nwaco


Redlining
Posts: 407
posted January 20, 2003 07:16 PM

Brad, I too have a truck that came with the "interior pool" problem. It is next on the list. It looks like you have a plan, and as long as you keep moisture away, you have a chance.

The whole process is a lot of work, and we all share the pain of protecting our toys for long term enjoyment. It seems that it will forever be a non-ending task and that is more reason than ever to get the best bang for our efforts. The bottom line is any positive action to protect your vehicle is better than doing nothing and getting
only a few short years out of a limited supply of trucks. These are now "hobby trucks" and only a fraction of the vehicles out there are going to make it through the next ten years , and chances are they will be owned by dedicated people like us who share information on just how and why to protect and appreciate them.

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